When the President of the United States Writes an Article in Your Journal

How do you edit Barack Obama? The Chronicle spoke to the editor in chief of a journal that published the president’s article on the future of health-care reform on Monday.

When the President of the United States Writes an Article in Your Journal – The Chronicle of Higher Educati… by Arielle Martinez on Scribd

In a Time of Tension, Universities Craft New Free-Speech Policies

After a year of highly publicized protests against racism on campuses, colleges must decide this summer what the balance between free speech and public order will look like in the coming academic year.

In a Time of Tension, Universities Craft New Free-Speech Policies – The Chronicle of Higher Education by Arielle Martinez on Scribd

Student Activists Bring Demands to the Table. Not Everyone Leaves Satisfied.

Claremont McKenna College was among the campuses caught up in a wave of protests over racial-climate issues last year. What followed there illustrates the difficulties many colleges face in turning demands into reality.

Student Activists Bring Demands to the Table. Not Everyone Leaves Satisfied – The Chronicle of Higher Educa… by Arielle Martinez on Scribd

Federal Agencies Don’t Fund Big Gun-Violence Research. Can California?

The state’s Legislature voted on Thursday to create the California Firearm Violence Research Center in the UC system, aimed at “filling the gap” left by restrictions at the federal level.

Federal Agencies Don’t Fund Big Gun-Violence Research. Can California? – The Chronicle of Higher Education by Arielle Martinez on Scribd

How Community Colleges Use Job-Market Data to Develop New Programs

College systems in Kentucky and other states are turning to companies for information that is more current and detailed than federal data on the skills that employers are looking for.

  How Community Colleges Use Job-Market Data to Develop New Programs – The Chronicle of Higher Education by Arielle Martinez on Scribd

Zuccaire Gallery presents solo exhibition by Isabel Manalo

A paper and fabric collage created by Washington D.C.-based artist Isabel Manalo, titled Isang Araw (One Day), hangs on the wall of the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University during the opening reception for the exhibition “Isabel Manalo: Skin Codes” on Saturday, Nov. 7, 2015. Photo by Kristy Gerlett.

The flesh-colored pieces of unstretched canvas hung on the plain white walls of the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery — some of them flat, others coming off the walls like wrinkled, puckered skin. On them were painted intricate scripts from a centuries-old alphabet. Driplines from red paint stained the canvas like spilled blood. Words in gold and blue stuck out like tattoos:

#blacklivesmatter

#withsyria

#climatechangeisreal

These works of art are a part of a solo exhibition by Washington DC-based artist Isabel Manalo at the Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University, which opened on the evening of Saturday, Nov. 7. The exhibition is called “Isabel Manalo: Skin Codes.”

“Each painting is an expression or idea of issues I’m interested in, such as Black Lives Matter,” Manalo said.

The artist was present for Saturday’s opening reception at the gallery, and dozens of people from the local area stopped by to marvel at her work.

Manalo, who is Filipino-American, used symbols inspired by indigenous Filipino tattoos and a pre-colonial Filipino script called the Baybayin, as well as symbols from contemporary social media such as hashtags and emojis, in her work to explore themes of race, ethnicity, war and the environment.

“I wanted to delve into this indigenous tattoo tradition free of any western reference,” Manalo said.

For the exhibition, Manalo created a new large textile piece specifically for the soffit of the Zuccaire Gallery’s ceiling. It is a canvas tapestry with hashtags of the names of unarmed black people who were killed by police — #MichaelBrown, #EricGarner, #TamirRice, and so on — painted in gold.

Once the tapestry was hung up on the ceiling, Manalo got onto a mechanical lift and sewed the finishing touches to the piece herself, Samantha Clink, the gallery’s community relations assistant, said.

Clink said she admires the fact that Manalo took the time reach out to art students at Stony Brook University and the way Manalo incorporates contemporary issues that young people can understand into her work.

“I’ve worked with various artists, and she is the one artist that stands out in my mind who’s taken the time,” Clink said. “She’s been here for a week doing installation she has taken time out off every day to talk to an entire class.”

Karen Levitov, the director of the Zuccaire Gallery, has known Manalo for years; they met while working at a contemporary art museum in Madison, Wisconsin before going to different graduate schools.

“It was nice because we had parallel careers: one in art curating and one in art making,” Levitov said.

When Levitov became the director of the 5,000 square-foot gallery a year and a half ago, Manalo was one of the first artists to whom she reached out.

“[Manalo] came and looked at the space and like most artists, they come and look at the space, and they’re just like ‘Wow, that’s such a huge wonderful fabulous space!’ And she was so excited,” Levitov said.

Manalo has had other solo exhibitions in the past including one at the Orlando Museum of Art in Florida last year and at Addison Ripley Fine Art in Washington D.C. in 2009 and 2012. She will have another exhibition at Addison Ripley next year. Manalo recently returned to the states after living in Berlin for the last three years.

As the guests of the reception roamed around the Zuccaire Gallery looking at the artwork, a woman dressed in all black stood in the corner, playing the violin — the music sometimes vibrant and staccato, at other times smooth and mournful.

The violinist, as it turns out, was none other than the artist’s older sister, Anna Manalo. She played compositions that she wrote herself and were inspired by Filipino music to match the aesthetic of her sister’s artwork.

“It’s always been a dream of mine to collaborate with her,” Anna Manalo said.

The free exhibition will run through Dec. 12, and on Nov. 18, Manalo will have an artist talk at the gallery regarding her paintings. The gallery is on the first floor of the Staller Center for the Arts at Stony Brook University.

Read this story on TheLongIslander.info here.

Litigation brought against SBU over dog used for research

The Animal Finder allows people to adopt animals that are being used in labs in different universities. The Beagle Freedom Project website says that universities use animals in there experimental and learning labs to be used for experimental drug trails, veterinary training programs and heart experiments. Screenshot from IdentityCampaign.org

An animal rights advocacy organization has filed a lawsuit against Stony Brook University to force the university to release records on a dog being used in a research laboratory.

The California-based Animal Rescue, Media & Education filed in the lawsuit on Tuesday, Sept. 1 in the Suffolk County Supreme Court. The organization stated in the complaint that the university provided an “deficient” response to an open records request about the dog known as Quinn.

Animal Rescue, Media & Education, also known as the Beagle Freedom Project, launched an online Animal Finder tool in March that allows people to virtually “adopt” dogs and cats being used in research facilities.

“Adopters” can not actually take the animals home, but the Beagle Freedom Project sends participants template records request letters so that they can order the animals’ health records and care logs. The four dogs at Stony Brook that are listed on Animal Finder have all been “adopted.”

New York’s Freedom of Information Law, or FOIL, allows the public to request access to records from government agencies, including public universities like Stony Brook. The university must also report their use of research animals to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The request for Quinn’s records was filed by Melissa Andrews, a Maine resident, on March 25. She named the dog, whose identification code is CEEMCF.

The complaint said on April 8, Stony Brook only provided five pages of Quinn’s records in response to Andrew’s request.

“Indeed, in response to similar or identical requests, other publicly-funded state universities, which are governed by the same federal requirements, produced far more complete records than what was provided by Respondents,” the complaint reads. “In many cases, these institutions have provided hundreds of pages of records for one animal.”

The complaint also said that Stony Brook improperly redacted, or blacked out, parts of those five pages.

Andrews filed an appeal on April 23 to the State University of New York FOIL appeals officer, who denied the appeal on May 8.

Lauren Sheprow, a spokeswoman for Stony Brook University, said in an email that the university is unable to comment on litigation.

Read this story on The Statesman’s website here.

New women’s sport slated as part of “Together We Transform”

In a five-year plan revealed on June 29, Stony Brook Athletic Director Shawn Heilbron and the athletics department outlined several initiatives related to Title IX, including a plan to add a new women’s sport to the department.

Title IX is the federal clause that prohibits discrimination based on sex at any federally-funded educational institution.

The plan, titled “Together We Transform,” mentions the possible “successful addition of a new women’s sport program,” but it does not specify which women’s sport would be added. However, Heilbron did mention field hockey as a strong possibility in an interview with The Statesman.

“Certainly with our geographic footing and the area we’re in, one sport we’re looking at is field hockey,” he said. “But we still have to look at the costs.”

The America East Conference already sponsors field hockey competitions among the teams at University at Albany, University of New Hampshire, University of Maine, University of Vermont and University of Massachusetts Lowell.

However, Title IX does not just apply to participation in sports. An April 4, 2011 letterfrom the Department of Education Office of Civil Rights clarifies that Title IX’s definition of discrimination includes sexual harassment and assault.

“Typically, when we think of Title IX, we think of participation and equality,” Heilbron said. “But we also have to think about discrimination issues like assault. We do not want to be reactive. We want to be proactive.”

The five-year plan states that Athletics will “utilize life skills coordinators and student-athlete development staff to create appropriate educational opportunities for student-athletes to learn about the most topical issues surrounding Title IX concerns including, but not limited to, sex discrimination, sexual harassment and sexual violence.”

Donna Woodruff, executive associate director and deputy Title IX coordinator of Athletics, works with Marjolie Leonard, the university’s director of Title IX and Risk Management, to handle cases of misconduct, Heilbron said.

“We work hand-in-hand with campus, literally partners in handling misconduct,” he said. “We work hard to avoid these situations, but when they do happen, we move as quickly as possible to gather information.”

As for funding of women’s programs, the five-year plan states that Athletics will guarantee that “operating budgets, scholarship support and coaching salary levels are analyzed regularly to ensure that each individual program is positioned for success.”

The federal Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act requires every federally-funded, co-educational college or university that participates in intercollegiate athletics to publish an annual report that compares the amount of money spent on men’s and women’s sports programs. Stony Brook’s EADA report for the 2013-2014 reporting year is available on the federal Department of Education’s website.

The report shows that women’s teams had 211 total participants at the beginning of the season while men’s teams had 311 total participants. Sixty percent of athletically-related student aid went toward men’s teams, and 40 percent went toward women’s teams. Recruiting expenses totaled $197,998 for men’s teams and $80,464 for women’s teams.

Total expenses reached $8,993,139 for men’s teams and $4,854,655 for women’s teams. Men’s teams made $3,800,191 in revenues, while women’s teams made $1,282,341 in revenues. Heilbron explained that much of the differences in the expenses and revenues between men’s and women’s sports has to do with football, which had 99 participants.

“Football throws the numbers off, which is why [Title IX] is such an important part of our initiatives,” Heilbron said. “We want to support football, but we want to support women’s sports, too. Football is the most expensive sport, and it has the most student participants. There’s no women’s sport that has comparable participation.”

Federal regulations require that the Department of Education evaluate the level of equality between men’s and women’s sports by considering factors like equipment and supplies, scheduling and games and practices, provision of practice and training facilities, and publicity.

“It’s absolutely critical that we ensure that women’s programs have everything they need to accomplish what we set out to do,” Heilbron said.

Data from Stony Brook’s Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act report for the 2013-2014 reporting year. Graphic by Arielle Martinez.
Data from Stony Brook’s Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act report for the 2013-2014 reporting year. Graphic by Arielle Martinez.
Data from Stony Brook’s Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act report for the 2013-2014 reporting year. Graphic by Arielle Martinez.
Data from Stony Brook’s Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act report for the 2013-2014 reporting year. Graphic by Arielle Martinez.
Data from Stony Brook’s Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act report for the 2013-2014 reporting year. Graphic by Arielle Martinez.
Data from Stony Brook’s Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act report for the 2013-2014 reporting year. Graphic by Arielle Martinez.
Data from Stony Brook’s Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act report for the 2013-2014 reporting year. Graphic by Arielle Martinez.

Read this story on The Statesman’s website here.

Judge orders Stony Brook University to justify chimp captivity

A New York County Supreme Court judge has ordered a hearing at which Stony Brook University must justify its custody of two chimpanzees, but the order has raised the question of whether the chimpanzees can be granted human rights.

Justice Barbara Jaffe gave the order on April 20 after the Nonhuman Rights Project filed a lawsuit against the university. Jaffe’s original order granted the two chimps a “writ of habeas corpus,” which gave the chimps the human right to challenge their allegedly illegal imprisonment, but Jaffe later amended the order by removing the phrase.The Nonhuman Rights Project, a Florida-based organization, filed the lawsuit on behalf of Hercules and Leo, two male chimpanzees owned by New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana that are used for locomotion research in the Department of Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook University.

“The University does not comment on the specifics of litigation, and awaits the court’s full consideration on this matter,” Lauren Sheprow, the university’s media relations officer, said in an email.

In the lawsuit petition, the Nonhuman Rights Project wrote that the chimps are “autonomous and self-determining beings who possess those complex cognitive abilities sufficient for common law personhood and the common law right to bodily liberty, as a matter of common law liberty, equality or both.”

Steven Wise, a lawyer who is the founder and president of the Nonhuman Rights Project, said his organization petitioned for both a writ of habeas corpus and an order to show case, which requires Stony Brook to justify keeping the chimps, in order to “cover all the bases.” He said even though the writ of habeas corpus was struck out of Jaffe’s order, the Nonhuman Rights Project is still pleased with the results.

“In the end, it doesn’t matter what route you take to get Stony Brook to justify its detention of Hercules and Leo,” Wise said. “We’re just happy that the judge has given us a chance to argue this in court.”

The Nonhuman Rights Project first filed the lawsuit in December 2013 in Suffolk County Supreme Court. Judge W. Gerard Asher denied the group’s petition for habeas corpus on the ground that the chimps were not legally persons.

The organization also filed lawsuits for the release of two other chimpanzees living in New York: Tommy, a male chimp living on a lot owned by Circle L Trailers in Gloversville, and Kiko, a male chimp living in The Primate Sanctuary in Niagara Falls. Both of these lawsuits were dismissed by their respective courts.

The lawsuit petitions asked the judges to grant the chimps writ of habeas corpus and to order for the chimps to be moved to a sanctuary within the North American Primate Sanctuary Alliance.

The Nonhuman Rights Project filed an appeal for Hercules and Leo’s lawsuit to the New York Supreme Court’s Appellate Division, Second Judicial Department in Brooklyn, but the judges dismissed the appeal in April 2014.

The Nonhuman Rights Project then refiled its petition for Hercules and Leo in March 2015, this time in the New York County Supreme Court. If the court rules in favor of the Nonhuman Rights Project, the chimps will be released from the university and sent to Save the Chimps, a Florida sanctuary.

The hearing is scheduled for May 27 at 10:30 a.m. in the New York County Courthouse on Centre Street in Manhattan.

Read this story on The Statesman’s website here.